The Descendants

The Descendants Poster

After watching the film what remained in my mind was the well performing actors on a backdrop of the exotic Hawaiian setting, with the soothing music from Hawaii ringing in my ears. Deep emotions colliding with hysterical laughs, you travel smoothly though a plot which unfolds very smartly.

Matt – In his forties gets several serious shocks. The first comes with news that his wife had an accident and is in coma. As he is wishing for her getting well soon and trying to cope up with his responsibility of his younger daughter Scottie – a foul mouthed girl of ten; he gets another shock that his wife’s situation is not good at all and as per her will they will have to switch her off the support system. Now, he will have to deliver this news to their close relations. He then meets his elder daughter – Alex – a heavy drinker at her hostel and asks her join them. Its Alex who delivers the next shock to her dad, that her mum was actually cheating on him. Soon, he gets another shock that a couple who are friends with him and his wife know about this already. Along with all of this Matt who is a descendant of a dynasty and the trustee of his family, is negotiating the sale of a huge virgin land that will make him and his cousins all millionaires. This may also put their family heritage into hands of business men which means betraying his family. As he embarks on the journey of finding the man his wife cheated him for, along with bonding with his daughters, he is faced with another shock that it is this man who will also be benefitted by his sale of the family land.

Seems very much like a emotional drama; but the script is so powerful you get instantly involved in the film. George Clooney’s character – Matt – lands in serious awkward moments, which have been portrayed beautifully by him in tight framed close-up shots.

The use of Hawaii as the setting for the film has given way to the beautiful Hawaiian music and sceneries which in turn add the exoticness to the film – which otherwise would have felt quite drab if the setting of the film was in some ordinary city.

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